National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Goddard Space Flight Center

Sun-Earth Day 2010: Ancient Mysteries, Future Discoveries

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Watch NASA's Sun-Earth Day Web Cast!

March 19, 2011, Goddard Space Flight Center, MD

On the set of NASA Edge during the Sun-Earth Day web cast

Sun Earth Day 2011: Ancient Mysteries and Future Discoveries!

To view the archived web cast, go to the NASA Edge Ustream Channel and scroll to the bottom.

NASA EDGE is proud to join forces with the Sun Earth Day Team to celebrate Sun Earth Day 2011: Ancient Mysteries and Future Discoveries. NASA EDGE webcasts live during the Sun Earth Day Tweet Up at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on March 19, 2011 at 2 pm EDT. Subject matter experts from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, MD and the National Solar Observatory in Sunspot, NM will explain some of the earliest recorded solar observations by ancient civilizations and how current observations are enhancing our understanding of the sun and our heliosphere. Then we take a sneak peak at future developments in observation technology that should lead to unprecedented imagery and insight into the Sun. Plus, don't miss a special promo for a huge Sun Earth Day event that will take place in 2012. All this and more on NE Live@Sun Earth Day 2011!

Subject Matter Experts featured on the webcast include:

  • NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
  • Eric Christian
  • Holly Gilbert
  • Lou Mayo
  • Thomas Moore
  • Michelle Thaller
  • National Solar Observatory
  • Dave Dooling
  • Pete Eidenbach
  • Steve Keil

NASA Fact

Nearly identical eclipses (total, annual, or partial) occur after 18 years and 11 days, or every 6,585.32 days (Saros Cycle).