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Sun-Earth Day 2008: Space Weather Around the World

Sun-Earth Day 2008: Space Weather Around the World

SUN-EARTH DAY HIGHLIGHTS: ASP CONFERENCE

This podcast shares highlights from 2 sessions that took place at the Astronomical Society of the Pacific conference in Chicago. Several of the programs that were mentioned by presenters and participants are listed below.

Session Title: "Space Weather Around the World: Using educational Technology to engage an Audience and Increase Interest in Science Content".

Participant Amanda Maynard refers to the ‘Adler Night and Day Podcasts’ http://www.adlerpodcast.com/. This bi-weekly podcast features observable celestial and man-made objects in the night sky as well as observed and forecasted solar activity.

Presenter Lou Mayo offers information on Sun-Earth Day’s Amateur Astronomy program http://sunearthday.nasa.gov/2008/getinvolved/aa.php . As skilled sky observers and students of astronomy, you can give others a better understanding of the role the sun plays in our existence.

Presenter Elaine Lewis shares highlights from the Sun-Earth Day program and how it continues to increase the public’s interest in science content through the use of educational technology and a sound thematic approach.

Presenter Troy Cline demonstrates how students can quickly track the progress of a solar storm over the internet with the ‘Space Weather Action Center’ http://sunearthday.nasa.gov/swac/.

Session Title: "The Living Astronomy and People of the Mayan World Today".

Presenters Isabel Hawkins and Felipe Tapia provide a glimpse of the living culture of the Mayan people in the Yucatan, where science and astronomy are practiced in a manner that integrates every other aspect of their culture into a native science. During their presentation they made several references to the popular Sun-Earth Day theme, “Ancient Observatories: Timeless Knowledge” http://sunearthday.nasa.gov/2005/index.htm . This website features solar alignments with structures that mark the equinoxes and/or solstices.

GALLERY

Space Weather Fact

The core of the sun is nearly as dense as lead, and has a temperature of 15 million °C.

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